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Payoff

After a score, the PCs take stock of their income from the operation. A successful score generates both rep and coin.

The crew earns 2 rep per score by default. If the target of the score is higher Tier than you, take +1 rep per Tier higher. If the target of the score is lower Tier, you get -1 rep per Tier lower (minimum zero).

If your crew is Tier I and you pull off a successful score against a Tier III target, you earn 4 rep (2 rep, +2 rep for a target two tiers above you). If your crew is Tier III and you complete a score against a Tier I target, you earn 0 rep (2 rep, -2 rep for the lower Tier target).

If you keep the operation completely quiet so no one knows about it, you earn zero rep. Mark the rep on the rep tracker on the crew sheet.

The crew earns coin based on the nature of the operation and/or any loot they seized:

  • 2 coin: A minor job; several full purses.
  • 4 coin: A small job; a strongbox.
  • 6 coin: A standard score; decent loot.
  • 8 coin: A big score; serious loot.
  • 10+ coin: A major score; impressive loot.

Record the coin on the crew sheet, or divvy it up among the crew members as you see fit.

Most districts have crime bosses that expect smaller crews to pay a tithe from their scores. Ask the GM if there’s a boss that you should be paying. Subtract coin equal to your crew Tier +1 when you pay a tithe to a boss or larger organization. If you’re supposed to be paying off a boss, but you don’t, start a clock for that boss’s patience running out. Tick it whenever you don’t pay. Every time it fills up, lose 1 faction status with them.

You can set the scene and play out a meeting with a client or patron who’s paying the crew if there’s something interesting to explore there. If not, just gloss over it and move on to the next part of downtime.

GM, definitely don’t screw around with the players when it comes to the payoff. Don’t say that the client lied and there’s no reward. Or that the meeting for the payment is actually a trap, or whatever. These types of things are staples of crime fiction, but in Blades, the PCs have enough problems coming at them from every direction already. When it comes to getting paid, just give them what they earned.